Last edited by Motaur
Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

2 edition of Making tea, making Japan found in the catalog.

Making tea, making Japan

cultural nationalism in practice

by Kristin Surak

  • 142 Want to read
  • 20 Currently reading

Published by Stanford University Press in Stanford, California .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Japanese tea ceremony,
  • Nationalism,
  • Japanese National characteristics

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementKristin Surak
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsGT2910 .S854 2012
    The Physical Object
    Paginationpages cm
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25361510M
    ISBN 109780804778664, 9780804778671
    LC Control Number2012021000

      Other choices: This is the largest section of plants in the book and includes 20 plants with leaves suitable for making tea. Among those are lemon balm, mint, rosemary, sage and thyme. You’ll follow a master of the tea ceremony, learn to create your own matcha, and see how the delicate flavors and traditions of green tea have changed across Japan. Learn Matcha Making from a Pro in Tokyo Voyagin Verified Add to Wishlist Share ID: Sold Out.5/5(1).

    A tea ceremony is a ritualized form of making tea (茶 cha) practiced in East Asia by the Chinese, Koreans and Japanese. The tea ceremony (Chinese: 茶道 or 茶禮 or 茶艺), literally translated as "way of tea" in Japanese, "etiquette for tea" or "tea rite" in Korean, and "art of tea" in Chinese, is a cultural activity involving the ceremonial preparation and presentation of tea.   According to Kristin Surak, a professor of Japanese politics and author of Making Tea, Making Japan, the tea ceremony is full of contradictions. It's a .

    "[How to Make Tea] is a textbook for serious tea drinkers, but one enabling you to pass a practical exam you certainly won't mind studying for." --Cuppa Coasters "This is the dream book for any tea-lover, exploring the botany, chemistry, and health advantages of the beloved tea plant/5(21). Tea is for Everyone aims to bridge that treacherous gap between academic tea literature (much of which is not available in English) and the generic tea “guides” that don’t do tea or Chinese tea any justice. This book is a comprehensive and comprehensible take on a .


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Making tea, making Japan by Kristin Surak Download PDF EPUB FB2

"Surak's Making Tea, Making Japan is one of the most astute studies of the ceremony to appear in decades. Beyond tea aficionados, Surak's book should be read by scholars and students of culture and nationalism because Surak's main contribution is showing how these two fields of embodied culture and nationalism are so deeply intermeshed in the practice of tea.".

"Surak's Making Tea, Making Japan is one of the most astute studies of the ceremony to appear in decades. Beyond tea aficionados, Surak's book should be read by scholars and students of culture and nationalism because Surak's main contribution is showing how these two fields of embodied culture and nationalism are so deeply intermeshed in the Cited by: Making Tea, Making Japan book.

Read 4 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. The tea ceremony persists as one of the most evocative symb /5(4). Deftly crossing disciplinary boundaries between anthropology, sociology, and history, Making Tea, Making Japan is a well-crafted and interpretively provocative book that anyone with an interest in Japanese society and the theoretical dynamics of nationalism will find fascinating [B]eautifully written and lucidly argued, the book offers Brand: Stanford University Press.

Making Tea, Making Japan. Cultural Nationalism in Practice. Kristin Surak. PAGES. Cite this book. Cover Images.

Print. Marketing Flyer. RIS Citation. Export to citation manager. TY - BOOK TI - Making Tea, Making Japan: Cultural Nationalism in Practice AU - Surak, Kristin SP - CY - Stanford PB - Stanford University Press PY.

Deftly crossing disciplinary boundaries between anthropology, sociology, and history, Making Tea, Making Japan is a well-crafted and interpretively provocative book that anyone with an interest in Japanese society and the theoretical dynamics of nationalism will find fascinating/5(25).

The Japanese tea ceremony, also called the Way of Tea, is a Japanese cultural activity involving the ceremonial preparation and presentation of matcha (抹茶), powdered green tea.

In Japanese, it is called cha-no-yu (茶の湯) or sadō, chadō (茶道), while the manner in which it is performed, or the art of its performance, is called (o)temae ([お]手前; [お]点前). Making Tea, Making Japan: Cultural Nationalism in Practice, by Kristin Surak (Book review). Kristin Surak’s Making Tea, Making Japan is one of the most transformative volumes I have read in some time, and deserves a reading beyond those who most obviously must engage it -- those who study Japanese society and those who are interested in nation formation.5/5.

Read "Making Tea, Making Japan Cultural Nationalism in Practice" by Kristin Surak available from Rakuten Kobo. The tea ceremony persists as one of the most evocative symbols of Japan.

Originally a pastime of elite warriors in premo Brand: Stanford University Press. T o cite this article: Stephanie Assmann () Making T ea, Making Japan. Cultural Nationalism in Cultural Nationalism in Practice, Social History, DOI: /Author: Stephanie Assmann.

Kristin Surak is an Associate Professor of Politics at SOAS, University of London, and a past Richard B. Fisher Member of the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. Her research focuses on international migration, nationalism, culture, and political sociology. Her book Making Tea, Making Japan: Cultural Nationalism in Practice received the Outstanding Book Award from the American.

This book examines the complex relationship between class and gender dynamics among tea ceremony (chadō) practitioners in Japan. Focusing on practitioners in a provincial city, Akita, the book surveys the rigid, hierarchical chadō system at grass roots level.

Making critical. Japanese sweets making and Tea Ceremony in Osaka. The last one is very unique as Japanese desserts have a distinctive flavor as the history of cooking in Japan didn’t include processed sugar till only a few hundred years ago. You will learn even more about the flavors of Japan, as well as the range of utensils used and explanation of the 5/5(29).

Making of Japanese Tea By the Tea Ceremony Master Himeji -- November The Book of Tea. The Cup of Humanity T and grew into a beverage.

In China, in the eighth century, it entered the realm of poetry as one of the polite amusements. The fifteenth century saw Japan ennoble it into a religion of æstheti-cism—Teaism.

Teaism is a cult founded on the adoration of. You can do this easily by drinking more matcha green tea or making delicious desserts. 3 Things You Need To Make Matcha Since matcha is in the form of a finely ground powder, the way we make it is very different from the way to prepare loose-leaf green teas.5/5.

Enjoy wagashi making & Tea ceremony. You will make a Japanese confectionery and Green tea. You won’t have to worry about searching for specific ingredients in Japanese shops, as all ingredients are provided for you when you arrive. Feel like a chef for the day by wearing a Kimono style chef jacket, in a Japanese kitchen.

Blood Stained Tea not only lives up to the promise of its blurb, it goes beyond that. Yakuza and m/m sounded intriguing enough but there was a lot more that kept me glued to the book.

Amy Tasukada's writing style is crisp and lyrical, like snowflakes dancing in the night/5. This Japanese Tea book is all about the Japanese Tea tradition as well as a photo collection that will make you want to go to Japan right now, take a peek inside. This Japanese Tea book was released this spring by Nikko Graphic Arts.

The book has two agendas. First teach us everything there is to know about tea and Japanese tea culture. Shareable Link. Use the link below to share a full-text version of this article with your friends and colleagues. Learn : Atsuko Ichijo. Her book Making Tea, Making Japan: Cultural Nationalism in Practice (Stanford University Press ) examines the relationship between cultural practices and national meanings by investigating how the tea ceremony is produced and sustained as distinctively Japanese.

Tea is the most popular beverage in Japan and an important part of Japanese food culture. Various types of tea are widely available and consumed at any point of the day. Green tea is the most common type of tea, and when someone mentions "tea" (お茶, ocha) without specifying the type, it is green tea to which is referred.